Monday, September 26, 2016

How New Managers Lead Their Teams to Victory

One cartoon boat with happy oarsmen is pulling ahead of the other boat with oarsmen unhappy with their boss

There are two ways…the right way and the wrong way to apply your new manager training to lead your team to victory. The best bosses know the difference. As you take up the mantle as a new manager, make sure you learn how to do it right. Here are some new manager training tips:

  • Inspire
    Remember why people go to work happily. It’s not just for the money…engaged workers check in because they believe in the company’s purpose and their ability to contribute. Share your vision with your team. Give them a goal to reach for. The best employees seek meaning in what they do from day to day. Articulate that meaning in a way that inspires commitment. You want employees engaged as they pull those oars.
  • Listen
    You are not there to dictate or to command. The best new managers don’t just talk, they listen. Be open with what challenges you face and invite their ideas for solutions. Encourage their questions and welcome their thoughts. Listen with respect.
  • Focus on individuals
    Yes, the team has common goal, but it is composed of individuals. As a new manager, when you want to engage employees with different backgrounds, motivations, abilities, working styles, and ambitions, you need to appeal to what they care about as individuals. 
  • Be available.
    Don’t close yourself off. The best new managers are available for their employees at any time for questions or concerns. Set up regular appointments for one-on-ones so you keep up-to-date on their work and performance. When you are a hands-on manager, few problems will slip past you. You want to earn the trust of your team so they willingly share their thoughts and ideas.
  • Be steady.
    Calm, capable captains steer the boat best. Don’t lose your cool. Your team relies upon your steady hand to guide them forward. They also need your confidence that problems can be solved and your acceptance of minor mistakes.
  • Be fun.
    Okay, so you don’t have to be a comedian. But welcome humor at your meetings. There is business to be accomplished but work should not be grim. The more your team members enjoy and respect one another, the happier they will be to check in every day.


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